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Quotes on Dread, Fear or Melancholy
Quotes on Dread, Fear or Melancholy

 “There was also the sickness of the soul that hung over the miner. When he was not in the mine, he still could not get the dread out of his mind – the dread of going back into the living grave and not knowing if the narrow tunnel would become an actual grave.” (Page 57)

 “As he returned to his room he felt the solitude and the emptiness the sparse setting seemed to reveal to his soul. He had felt homesickness, but this was the first time he realized what it was to feel loneliness.” (Page 62)

 “The swarming locusts are all those burdens which seem to overwhelm us. The creeping locusts are the thoughts we hold in our minds and never know how they got so entrenched there. They are the thoughts that keep us awake at night or the thoughts that cause our hearts to jump or our stomachs to sour when we awaken. They are fears and worries. The stripping locusts are the problems that arise after we think we cannot carry another burden. Finally, the gnawing locusts are the concerns which take our joy and cause us to be melancholy.” (Page 82)

 “It seemed more like the chain of events which kept happening tended to finally wear us down. We tended to grieve more over choices which turned bad than over natural disaster. For example, try taking a person’s life and he will fight you, but a person can give up and might even consider taking his own life. Some people call it melancholy. I call it the ‘Despondency.’” (Page 144)

 “Then, you get the dreaded realization that you are getting older. The things that used to be easy, like going through the day with little sleep, or putting in a full day’s work with energy to spare, become more difficult. When you are doing your required daily tasks, you want to be sleeping. When you are in bed, trying to go sleep, you wish it were day so you could get things done. The night seems endless and the things you picture in your mind seem to have a dark pallor of dread hanging over them.” (Page 145)

 Michael responded, “I don’t think it is the fear of failure or injury we all face, like those night terrors. I think we fear that our dreams, if reached, won’t be as fulfilling as we had imagined.” (Page 157)

 “The night was dark. The sound of the revelers in the street did not diminish the darkness or the loneliness. His thoughts were more of despondency. He recognized the loneliness and the fatigue. He was unfamiliar with the melancholy.” (Page 169)